Most public places and businesses have made their buildings wheelchair accessible, an extremely visible disability, but may be unaware of the less obvious challenges faced by people who have hearing loss. Installing a hearing loop clarifies speech and other sound for patrons with telecoil compatible hearing aids, is much less expensive than other modifications and may increase visitors or customers. Sometimes the managers of the venue simplyaren’t aware of how much a hearing loop might help. With a little effort you might be able to get them to install one.

Churches and other places of worship. While many places of worship are equipped with amplification equipment, many are not compatible or not convenient and there are many places without them at all. If this applies to your favorite worship place, bring it to the attention of organizational leaders and be sure to point out how a hearing loop will make hearing sermons much easier for their patrons. You might try to gain popular support for the idea by submitting an article to the website or newsletter of the church.

Theaters, auditoriums and other public buildings. The guidelines for the Americans for Disabilities Act require that assembly areas have a method of audio amplification for their visitors and this requirement is filled with the installation of a hearing loop. To promote this need, you can write to or meet with the people in charge of these public spaces and business to explain the need and benefits. For example, accommodating the hearing challenged will increase the number of visitors in these places.

More tips. No matter how you choose to bring up the matter, create understanding by sharing facts, promoting awareness for the need and garnering understanding. Define hearing loop, its function and costs. Have a prepare list of benefits from the patron’s perspective and the venue’s perspective. Entice them with the increases in patronage they will gain. And most importantly, be a friendly and helpful resource for your local community.