When a patient has trouble hearing because of the ear’s inability to conduct sound waves, she is suffering from conductive hearing loss. A congenital absence or malformation can result in this variety of hearing loss or it can be caused by an obstruction in the ear canal. Total restoration of hearing may be possible with the proper treatment for quite a few varieties of conductive hearing loss.

Conductive hearing loss may be attributable to one of several congenital problems. Some people are born without an ear canal or with an ear canal that did not open adequately when they were born. Structures within the inner ear may be deformed, preventing normal hearing. Surgery can take care of certain congenital issues. Those that can’t may be remedied with a hearing aid. Conductive hearing loss isn’t often caused by congenital issues.

Wax or fluid build-up in the outer ear is one of the more frequent causes of conductive hearing loss. This sort of buildup (commonly caused by ear infections) can adversely impact an individual’s hearing. Prescribed antibiotics can help to resolve ear infections, while a basic washing can be sufficient to address a buildup of wax.

Middle ear accumulation may also trigger conductive hearing loss. The most common cause of this issue is fluid accumulation. Commonly a result of ear infections, this problem is widespread in kids. Allergies and the common cold can cause sinus pressure, which then exerts pressure on the inner ear and interfere with an individual’s hearing. A uncommon cause of hearing loss in the middle ear is tumors.

Other troubles may cause conductive hearing loss, including perforated eardrums and foreign bodies in the ear canal. Conductive hearing loss commonly happens on its own, but it can overlap with other forms of hearing loss. You’ll want to consult with a hearing care specialist immediately if you or a loved one are suffering from inexplicable hearing loss. Ability to hear can often be fully recovered with the proper treatment plan.